Dialing in the grip zone

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Alpinord
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Dialing in the grip zone

Postby Alpinord » Thu Dec 28, 2006 9:42 am

A friend suggested I stand on the floor and slide 1, 2 & 4 layers of paper to the point where the ski touches the floor to rough out and mark 'my' cold, med & wet grip zones. What other views are there on this and how do I then proceed to know how to fine tune or alter the initial zone areas?

Also, with typically less than optimal track conditions how can you tell best what's the grip wax and correct zone area versus the snow and track conditions? More often than not I'll be skiing in highly variable track conditions or untracked snow. How would this affect the optimal zone for an individual relative to their skis? My guess is more zone than less is better and wonder if even having a variable zone will truly make a difference versus just going with a one size fits all approach?

Additionally. apparently there are two schools of thought on whether or not to use a binder? When should I or when should I not use a binder wax?

TIA
Best regards, Terry, SlideWright
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swervy jervy
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Postby swervy jervy » Thu Dec 28, 2006 1:24 pm

Toko binder (the green stuff) has an excellent reputation. I use it when I wax. That's the layer to rub on then iron in then cork. Don't use too much though or it'll mix up with the next layer. And don't use your glide wax iron for grip wax. For obvious reasons.

Some people consider binder a problem if you ski down through the the grip wax layers until you're left skiing on binder which is almost always not gonna be right for grip.

That's fine, but if you don't use binder and you ski down through the grip layers you're not gonna have grip either, so that beef seems moot.

One other reason I like the stuff. I don't like to sand my grip zone every time I ski. I keep that to once about every ten to fifteen skis. Sanding removes base so be wise with that. Although it does help. I feel that using binder allows me to take it a little easier on sanding off the base of my expensive skis.

In conclusion, Toko base green is excellent binder, cover with it lightly and iron it in if you can before corking. Don't go crazy with the sandpaper.

Have fun.
Last edited by swervy jervy on Thu Dec 28, 2006 11:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

donpollari
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Postby donpollari » Thu Dec 28, 2006 9:19 pm

Wax your kick zone too long, forward and back. Ski and then mark the points where the kick wax has worn back to.

This will be your personally exact kick zone for the conditions you just skied in.

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Alpinord
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Postby Alpinord » Tue Jan 02, 2007 6:57 pm

Nothing like the direct, low tech, common sense approach.

Seems like using binder for everything makes the most sense.

After removing grip wax with a paint scraper how concerned should I be about getting off every last bit of wax before applying new wax? How often to reapply binder?

Thanks,
Best regards, Terry, SlideWright

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Montana
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Postby Montana » Wed Jan 03, 2007 8:53 am

After removing grip wax with a paint scraper how concerned should I be about getting off every last bit of wax before applying new wax? How often to reapply binder?


I'd say it depends. If you are recreationally skiing, skiing for fun or out for a quick training run then stripping the grip zone down to a bare clean base isn't all that important. Sure if there is a soft wax in there and you don't cover it with a harder wax when the temp drops or there's new snow it may stick to the soft wax. Usually though you can wax over the soft stuff and get away with it.

It you are preparing for a race or any other real ski where performance is important then I'd scrap every thing off that I could. I'd then clean the base with a good wax remover and let it dry maybe overnight. Periodically I might even sand the wax zone to roughen it up a little. Then I'd carefully apply the wax du jour (including probably a binder).
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Alpinord
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Postby Alpinord » Wed Jan 03, 2007 10:00 am

Thanks Montana. It's pretty much how I see it for grip as well as glide waxes.
Best regards, Terry, SlideWright

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