Toko Structurite

What works best and How to

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poimax05
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Toko Structurite

Postby poimax05 » Tue Jan 27, 2015 3:17 pm

Hi,

I am very curious to hear Toko Structurite feedback (or equivalent swix rilling tool)

I do both classic and skate (but I just started skate this year). I do not race, but I like a nice glide, passing other skiers and am willing to spend reasonable money and efforts in order to go faster.

For glide, I typically use Swix F4 ironed on my classic skis and skate skis, sometimes complemented with Swix CH

I have read that suction becomes a big problem for warm temperatures, and am trying to find out what can be done to improve it, considering I love skiing when it's warm (and I hope that skate skiing will greatly improve my spring experience this year as classic is always tricky at warm temperature)

So looking at my options, I can either change from Swix F4 to appropriate Swix LF. but I doubt it will really make a difference as F4 already contains fluor (I am not willing to go to HF which is way too expansive)

I can also try to add some structure using Toko structurite. The problem is that I cannot try it first and the cost is not negligible. The basic tool comes with the red roller, while the yellow roller is I believe the one for which the structurite would help the most. So I would rather buy the kit with the 3 rollers, which cost about 200$ canadian. It is quite expansive, but may be worth it considering it can be a life time investment (especially when compared to HF wax which has a high cost for each use)

So my question is the following : is it worth it for a non-racer ? Will I notice a difference on warm days ? What about red or blue days ? Noticeable difference as well ? Or is it something only worth for racing to gain fractions of seconds ?

Your comments are welcome.

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nxski
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Re: Toko Structurite

Postby nxski » Thu Jan 29, 2015 1:41 pm

I have found the tool to work really well in conjunction with LF waxes. A stucturite roller will press a structure into your base that will come out when you wax next. A riller will cut grooves into your base which can be a good option if you're creating a wet weather specific ski, but can't be reversed without stone grinding.
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poimax05
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Re: Toko Structurite

Postby poimax05 » Thu Jan 29, 2015 3:26 pm

Ok great. Do you use all 3 rollers (blue, red and yellow) or just the red one ?

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nxski
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Re: Toko Structurite

Postby nxski » Thu Jan 29, 2015 7:50 pm

poimax05 wrote:Ok great. Do you use all 3 rollers (blue, red and yellow) or just the red one ?


It works best in wet conditions, so I have all 3, but I usually just use the red and yellow.
"Live the life you love, love the life you live"

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Loran
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Re: Toko Structurite

Postby Loran » Fri Jan 30, 2015 6:37 am

Zachary Caldwell wrote a while ago that the Swix Super Riller T401 is probably the first tool to put in your prepping box.
Rolling tools have taken the lead since then.

T401 has two drawbacks :

- Rills are more or less permanent and therefore you'd better have two pairs of skis. But This is the first thing to do anyway.
- 2mm and 3mm tools can produce projecting edges. The good thing is that now there are out there good cutting tools to properly shave those (Primateria, Kuzmin, Norske Ski AS)

The proper pair of ski + a 2mm rill makes a huge difference on warm days.

So; all in all, T401 is back, IMHO


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