Ping - Rex Powergrip users

What works best and How to

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donpollari
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Ping - Rex Powergrip users

Postby donpollari » Fri Dec 08, 2006 11:01 am

I've a classic 10k tomorrow and want to try some Rex Powergrip for kick on a pair of skis.

I've heard this wax is a bit tricky to work with and needs to be a thin, smooth layer or your skis will be slow.

What's the best technique/s for applying Rex Powergrip to skis?

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Montana
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Postby Montana » Fri Dec 08, 2006 11:22 am

I've used Rex Powergrip a few times and find it very good.

It is very durable, has a wide range of working temperatures, can be waxed over if you've made a mistake and it easy to remove.

Vary the thickness of the application depending on snow condition. There are some symbols on the tin to indicate which conditions require slightly thicker or thinner applications. Since this is the case then it would be best to experiment with the stuff before the big race.

Here's some info I got from Steve Bantz of Milwaukee who has used Power Grip for several years:

1) Use an iron other than your glide wax iron. Set iron for low heat.

2) Touch wax to iron then quickly apply a very thin covering to a short section of kick zone (use a kick zone equal to klister zone). Repeat until the kick zone is covered.

3) After waxing to kick zone smooth out wax with iron. Don't press down hard because this will thin the wax too much. Start with it thin and run the iron on it lightly to only smooth it out.

4) Let the skis cool outside.  After they are cool take a cork and smooth some more.

5) Take a scraper with you when skiing and testing and if wax grabs thin out with scraper.

Steve believes the application is like klister, “Put on thin to win.”  Remember you can take your kick waxes with you and apply on top as needed like over a base wax.

The Rex web site had this info:
Notice that Power Grip should be applied making very thin layers. Power Grip is easy to apply if it is first warmed up with a heat gun or hair dryer. Spread evenly using your finger, heat gun is a helpful tool also is spreading.

Personnally I found that a slightly thicker application worked better BUT still keep it thin. Make sure the final application is smooth.

Good luck!
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donpollari
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Excellent

Postby donpollari » Fri Dec 08, 2006 1:09 pm

Thanks, that's exactly the info I was looking for. I'll give it a try tonight.

Cheers

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Postby Montana » Fri Dec 08, 2006 3:20 pm

donpollari,
Let us know how it worked for you. Which color did you use? Snow temp and type etc. It'll help with my personal database for PowerGrip.
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donpollari
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will do

Postby donpollari » Fri Dec 08, 2006 5:53 pm

Click the Soldier Hollow 12/9/06 race for the forecast at:

http://www.tokous.com/Waxtips/UT%20ID%2 ... untain.htm


Ian Harvey is the tokoUS guy and lives a couple miles from Soldier Hollow, his recommendations are usually spot on. With that scenario in mind I'm prepping my #1 stiff skis with Power Grip 4 (+3...-5 Celsius). I'll have a soft kicking backup pair with some binder on them and I'll bring my Atomic Multi's just in case it's impossible waxing conditions. There's a weak front moving through and there actually could be some new snow right around freezing = Atomic Multi's.

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Postby Greggb » Fri Dec 08, 2006 10:28 pm

A friend of mine swears by power grip. I told him I was looking to get some high end waxless skis and he told too forgoe waxless and just get regular classic boards and use Power Grip. His exact words were "with Power Grip you never need to carry grip wax and a cork".
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Postby Montana » Fri Dec 08, 2006 10:28 pm

While I was poking around the web this afternoon I happened to check the Soldier Hollow conditions. Looked real interesting for sure. I'd use my fast old Karhu Kevlar Plus hairies--the ones with the 1983 Birkie sticker on them.
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Postby Montana » Fri Dec 08, 2006 10:33 pm

Greg,
Power Grip is good but I'm not sure I'd throw away my cork, scraper and waxless skis just yet. This would be espcially true during the learning process. A couple of times I missed the Rex wax job and used a hard wax on top of the Power Grip.
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Applying Rex Powergrip

Postby slowlee » Sat Dec 09, 2006 11:12 am

I warm the can with a heat gun (a hair dryer will work too) and dot it on the kick zone with my thumb. I then heat with the gun and smooth with the same thumb. Figure on a short kick zone with the purple.

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race report

Postby donpollari » Sat Dec 09, 2006 4:19 pm

Last night I did the warm iron dabbing technique to get the Powergrip on the base. I smoothed the layer with the iron and then used my finger to get a smoother finish.

Conditions this morning were old snow, blazing sunshine, air temp 22 degrees Fahrenheit at 8:30 and warming quickly. I did a warm up lap with a friend of mine and my kick was great except for some slippage on the steeper uphills. I had waxed conservatively with a thin short layer and I'm positive it would have worked fine had I gone with a thicker layer and waxed my normal hard wax pocket rather than my klister pocket.

Snow temp was up to 28 degrees Fahrenheit at about 9:45, my start time was ~10:30 so I needed more kick. I didn't have the Powergrip along so I put 3 layers of Toko red over the Powergrip and longer - over my hardwax zone. Tested them out and they were working great. There was more waiting and temps continued to rise so I added one short layer of Toko Yellow under my foot before the start.

During the race my skis were great, plenty of kick and still gliding well. I had to herringbone a couple times but this was due to fitness/technique, not lack of kick.

I'll continue to use Powergrip for hard track conditions. The durability and range of the wax seems to exceed other kick waxes and with experience
I should be able to dial in the thickness and length of layer that will work best for me.


P.S. Montana, hardwax was the call rather than hairies. The thing about Soldier Hollow and Utah in general is how arid it is. Because of this, the snow tends to stay very dry, good old Rex Blue is a great glide wax around here. Because the relative humidity is so low the snow doesn't really melt even at temps up around freezing. Instead, I think it's sublimating. A bike racing buddy of mine who just started classic skiing was going to race on his only classic skis which are Atomic Multi's. These are pretty equivalent to hairies but with a bit larger temp range. He was slipping alot when I saw him before the start. I suspect he struggled quite a bit.

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Postby Montana » Mon Dec 11, 2006 1:29 pm

dompollari,
Thanks for the info. The powerGrip does take some dialing in to get it to work best for you.

I agree about the hairies. They must have wet snow to work. I moved out west from the Midwest. When temps got to the low 30s in Wisconsin, Illinois or Michigan it got wet and hairies worked well. The snow in the west stays dry until temps get well above thawing. I think you are correct that the very low humidity plays a big part in this. I think the altitude also is a factor.

I tend to switch to skating when the snow temps are such that waxing is difficult. When it starts to rain at Izaak Walton Inn where I frequently ski the hairies make for a great classic ski. Seems like last winter it rained a lot even though there was a ton of snow.
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Postby MN Hoser » Tue Dec 12, 2006 12:36 pm

Don. I think of the PG waxes as a good wax for between klister and hardwax. If the tracks have melted and frozen so you have an icy track, but not boiler plate/skating ring track, the purple PG can be really, really good. Excellent grip without any noticeable drag. The other advantage of PG, is that's it's a polymer, so the durability is very high. I haven't pulled it out for a few years, so you could say I still think there's a place for hardwaxed and klisters in a kickwax box. I know a number of people use PG as a binder...they try the wax as is, and wax over if it's not perfect....just as you did.

JW

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PG as binder

Postby donpollari » Tue Dec 12, 2006 9:29 pm

Agreed, The layers of Toko red mixed into and smoothed out beautifully on top of the power grip.

A buddy of mine uses it regularly and likes it alot except for fresh snow/sharp crystal conditions. Seems like when the tracks are a bit slippery it provides better kick than conventional waxes with no glide penalty.

Cheers

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Postby swervy jervy » Fri Jan 12, 2007 4:31 pm

I just got some Rex tape, too. Quick question: regarding pine needles and other junk on the tracks, of which we have inevitably between storms.

Can you effectively scrape old, dirty hardwax off your boards and not disturb the Rex tape? Or do you need to change the tape if you scrape?

I haven't even tried the stuff yet, but I'm curious about this.

Thanks!


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