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Dry land training

Posted: Sat Apr 15, 2017 8:03 am
by Pat
I'm familiar with hill bounding but I've read about a term cause "moosewalking." What is that? Is it like hill bounding? Thanks.

Pat

Re: Dry land training

Posted: Sat Apr 15, 2017 9:06 am
by Magnus Johansson
I believe they are practically the same. Charlotte Kalla demonstrates mooselumbering here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K6epw3K7qBk

It is important to have an elongated and low stride and let the poles be active in propelling you, just like when skiing with a diagonal stride.

Re: Dry land training

Posted: Sun Apr 16, 2017 5:48 am
by Pat
Hey thanks Magnus. Hope you are well Sir and I appreciate your always quick responses and knowledge.

Pat

Re: Dry land training

Posted: Tue May 02, 2017 1:33 pm
by Neuro
Here's another video with closeups: https://youtu.be/0ePLQsV5Xu0?t=26s

Re: Dry land training

Posted: Wed May 10, 2017 10:51 am
by Pat
Here is another question for you Folks -- it is a running training technique to do both for sprinting and some easier running while pulling a tire behind you. Anyone ever try this with roller skis? The V2 skis that I have work well on a crushed gravel path and I already use the "speed reducers" all the time to make for a good workout. I was thinking maybe trying a tire pull in combination with that on that gravel path which is mostly flat and sparsely used. Anyone of you ever try this?

Pat

Re: Dry land training

Posted: Wed May 10, 2017 11:31 am
by Magnus Johansson
Pat wrote:Here is another question for you Folks -- it is a running training technique to do both for sprinting and some easier running while pulling a tire behind you. Anyone ever try this with roller skis?

No, I haven't tried it but it sounds interesting. What size of tire would be appropriate? A smaller car tire? 13 inches inner diameter?

Re: Dry land training

Posted: Thu May 11, 2017 9:48 am
by Pat
The one I use for running/hiking training is a 16 inch tire. I put an eye bolt through the middle part of the tread and then attach a lanyard that I attach to a carabineer around a waste belt. Usually I try to find ways to work out that give a nice workout in a short period of time. That definitely does that for those applications.

Pat

Re: Dry land training

Posted: Fri May 12, 2017 12:57 am
by Neuro
I know it's used as training for those who are going to be pulling sleds on expeditions and the like, but can't see how that could be fun training as one can't really stride or doublepole anymore, just 'walk'. Might as well just drop the skis altogether then.

Re: Dry land training

Posted: Fri May 12, 2017 5:56 pm
by davidb
I really don't agree.
I've used a tire to stiffen up roller ski interval work outs a lot, and I'm a total, complete old wimp. What I like: It takes a lot more strength; but striding up hill with good technique is still very possible, as is double poling. It's easy to get hips forward with out the fear of going nose first into the asphalt. (Particularly helpful in double pole, I think.) Also, the extra drag allows a return to the interval start point with out walking down; on the hill I use, even a little double pole here and there is required. I use a 205/15 which seems about right
The down side is it's a hassle to get the get the harness adjusted, and it's one more awkward piece of gear to haul around and maintain, still, it's a good strength workout.
But it's really conspicuous too; my wife puts this in the same category as grass herringbone workouts at the local park, she insists that I only do this after dark with a bag over my head!

Re: Dry land training

Posted: Sat May 13, 2017 6:22 am
by Pat
Gee David -- we must be married to the same lady!! Great input -- thanks for the info.

Pat

Re: Dry land training

Posted: Sat May 13, 2017 10:13 am
by Neuro
I was wrong then. Just assumed it would be impossible, but my guess is that it still needs a good amount of base power to be able to do.

davidb wrote:But it's really conspicuous too; my wife puts this in the same category as grass herringbone workouts at the local park, she insists that I only do this after dark with a bag over my head!

Lol :D

Re: Dry land training

Posted: Sat May 20, 2017 9:02 am
by Pat
I did the tire drag around on a few workouts now and it works just fine. I also agree that the added benefit is on those long steep hills that I would have to walk down, are now controllable with the tire doing the extra drag along with the speed reducers. So for what it is worth -- an excellent workout and an extra arrow in the quiver of workouts that we all like to do.

Pat