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Re: Roller skis

Posted: Tue Mar 17, 2015 9:27 am
by steener
I second the Roller Ski Shop skis. I have the T6101 with the drop forks. I used them several times a week last summer and they have been flawless. The wheels show very little wear for the amount of use.

Re: Roller skis

Posted: Sat Apr 04, 2015 4:08 pm
by m2qItMot
I am also looking to try RS - very useful discussion!

So, any opinions on the current V2 XLQ98 model? Also, has anyone tried the woodrollerski skate ones?

Re: Roller skis

Posted: Sun Apr 05, 2015 10:13 am
by m2qItMot
PS: I meant to say that I am particularly interested in the V2s because they seem to be the only brand that has variable speed reducers, whose resistance can be changed on the fly. I am assuming this is a serious advantage when going down moderate downhills. It is, right?

Re: Roller skis

Posted: Tue Apr 07, 2015 4:32 pm
by skiffrace
Well, yes and no.
I have V2s with adjustable speed reducers. They will work very well if your hill is long and gradual, and you apply the reducers beforehand.
OTOH, if the hills on your route come often (ie. you train in rolling terrain), then the speed reducers are useless, and you should look for some kind of real brakes.

Re: Roller skis

Posted: Tue May 19, 2015 4:13 pm
by nxski
skiffrace wrote:Well, yes and no.
I have V2s with adjustable speed reducers. They will work very well if your hill is long and gradual, and you apply the reducers beforehand.
OTOH, if the hills on your route come often (ie. you train in rolling terrain), then the speed reducers are useless, and you should look for some kind of real brakes.


I would just invest in wheels with good bearings to slow you down. I see far more accidents caused by people trying to use brakes than for any other reason.

Re: Roller skis

Posted: Sun May 24, 2015 11:32 am
by skiffrace
nxski wrote:Iw ould just inveest in wheels with good bearings to slow you down. I see far more accidents caused by people trying to use brakes than for any other reason.


You are probably right about the brakes. The problem with slow wheels is that they are slow everywhere, including uphills, which is not good.
All things considered, when it comes to hills, there are probably only 2 options. Either your technique must be really, really good, or simply don't rollerski in hilly terrain.
BTW, isn't it time someone finally came up with *working* rollerski brakes, not the half-baked crap manufacturers try to sell us as 'brakes'.

Re: Roller skis

Posted: Mon May 25, 2015 9:03 am
by TooHeavy
I always found tire or wheel compound justified the speed of the ski's. Bearings not so much.

Re: Roller skis

Posted: Mon May 25, 2015 11:53 am
by nxski
TooHeavy wrote:I always found tire or wheel compound justified the speed of the ski's. Bearings not so much.


That will affect the speed of the skis, but if you take Elpex for instance, they make multiple roller-ski's that all look the same, but the prices differ quite drastically due to the bearings. For $250 you can buy their entry roller-ski, which is great if you weight less than about 150lbs. If you weigh more than that or want a more challenging work-out, they have a $350 option with the only difference being the bearings, which have more resistance (the rims look different as well to differentiate between them). Usually people buy the wheels and bearings as a set and you'll want to be prepared to spend about $50/wheel for ones with higher resistance bearings.

Re: Roller skis

Posted: Mon May 25, 2015 12:15 pm
by davidb
TooHeavy wrote:I always found tire or wheel compound justified the speed of the ski's. Bearings not so much.


I agree with nx regarding Elpex bearings, at least regarding their great classic skis. But, also, Roller Ski shop also sells fast/slow wheels for their skate skis, and the speed difference is related to the bearings; the tire compound is the same.

Re: Roller skis

Posted: Thu Jan 21, 2016 2:04 pm
by Magnus Johansson
skiffrace wrote:
nxski wrote:Iw ould just inveest in wheels with good bearings to slow you down. I see far more accidents caused by people trying to use brakes than for any other reason.


You are probably right about the brakes. The problem with slow wheels is that they are slow everywhere, including uphills, which is not good.
All things considered, when it comes to hills, there are probably only 2 options. Either your technique must be really, really good, or simply don't rollerski in hilly terrain.
BTW, isn't it time someone finally came up with *working* rollerski brakes, not the half-baked crap manufacturers try to sell us as 'brakes'.


Have you seen Rollersafe's: http://www.rollersafe.no/

Re: Roller skis

Posted: Sat Feb 20, 2016 10:12 pm
by m2qItMot
Magnus: Yeah, those are great, if they really work as advertised. But they are pricey.

davidb: Rollerskishop actually seems to suggest that it is the rubber compound that make the difference. Here is what they say:
Choose your speed from 3 different long lasting rubber formulas that we guarantee for one year from defects.


Anyway, FWIW, I ended up buying a pair of V2 XLQ98. I can't really compare them to anything, since I have never skied anything else, but "so far so good", after maybe 100 km or so. The speed reducer is actually pretty decent, I think. It is easy enough to reach while in motion, so while not a real break, it can help you bring speed under control on a downhill, which is a very big plus, IMO.

One interesting thing about the speed reducers that I never saw mentioned: On a downhill, if you lift one foot, you immediately accelerate, quite unlike real skis! The reason is that the speed reduction has nothing to do with the weight you put on the wheels - it is just a fixed resistance. You lift a foot, you get half the resistance :-) Snow skis are not at all like that, for obvious reasons. I am assuming that using slow rubber compound, instead of speed reducers, will more closely match the real-ski experience.